30 Days of No Sugar, No Grain.

Pizza, ice cream, and tacos are life’s joys. I love them all so much, but unfortunately they do not love me back. I have been struggling for months, even years with negative body symptoms, which I could not exactly pinpoint the cause. The symptoms are pretty vague and include: bloating, heartburn, gas, joint pain, headaches, phlegm, stomach pain, rosacea, fatigue, and a mix of constipation and diarrhea, etc. The list of sexy symptoms goes on.

I knew my diet could be better, but I just did not know where to start for elimination. In September, I did 30 days without dairy and my symptoms did not seem to relent. So for October, after watching the documentary Fat, both my husband, Paul and I decided experiment by cutting added and refined sugar (including honey, agave, maple syrup, etc.) and grains (including corn, quinoa, rice, wheat, beer, etc.) from our diets for 30 days to see if we experienced positive results.

It sounds so simple to cut two things out of your diet, but the problem is sugar and grains are in nearly EVERYTHING. Sugar and grains are in drinks, pasta sauce, salad dressing, pre-packaged meals, etc. The list is overwhelming. Trying to find a restaurant that can accommodate these two restrictions was nearly impossible so instead we ate our meals at home. While our grocery bill may have went up, our savings did too because we were not spending money eating and drinking out.

The first few days were rough. This was not only due to craving sugar and the self discipline it took to refuse homemade cupcakes my coworker brought in, but because my body started to “withdrawal” from grains and sugar. The symptoms included stomach cramping, constipation, fatigue and irritability. So basically, nothing I was not already suffering from, but on a more intense scale. The one side effect I was not expecting was a random period. I have not had a period for years due to my Intrauterine Device (IUD) birth control, but switching to a high fat diet can cause a disruption with leptin and luteinizing hormones associated with periods. All the symptoms lasted only a few days for me.

The rest of the month I saw only benefits.

Cutting out grains and sugar was difficult the first two weeks but then it was like second nature. There were a couple instances of temptation. One was at a friends’ party where they made barbecue and multiple desserts and another was at a friend’s book launch where multiple hor d’oeuvres and wine were served. At the first party we were aware in advance and brought our no sugar, no grain sides and sadly avoided dessert. At the book launch, there was hummus and veggies brought out so I snacked on those while pining for the mini cupcakes. Overall, it was not as horrible as I prepared myself for. Paul and I did indulge ourselves for one day when a friend came to visit from Seattle. Oregon is known for its wine so we went wine tasting at a local vineyard. The tastings added up to about a glass. For food, we split a charcuterie board and ate the meats, cheeses, and olives; leaving the crackers behind. I felt deprived the first week, but for the other three I felt myself feeling content.

Staying home was the easiest way to avoid temptation. We only bought compliant foods and did not have to witness the copious amount of options outside of our house. We also made a point to tell our friends ahead of time in case any of them wanted to make dinner plans. After a yoga class when a friend of mine and I went out to eat, we were able to find a restaurant ahead of time that honored my food restrictions. 

On our day of freedom, October 31st (aka: Halloween), we went to my sister’s house which had bowls piled with brightly wrapped chocolates and other sugar filled treats. Paul and I were originally excited to be free from our limitations on Halloween because then we could indulge in the tradition of treats. Paul had a couple beers and I had: nothing. Not even a Reese’s peanut butter cup. I am never one to turn down chocolate (especially with peanut butter) but after 30 days without sugar I did not feel the need for artificially flavored candies. I wanted to save my splurge for something amazing, and I did (Danish strawberries and cream cake).

Paul and I went out for pizza with my sister and brother-in-law, who also eliminated sugar and grains for the month, and we treated ourselves to wine and pizza. This was the first non sugar, non grain meal I had experienced in those 30 days. The holy havoc the pizza wreaked on my stomach was unbearable. I laid in bed after dinner, crouched in the fetal position with a heating pad on my stomach for the rest of the night. I have had a few other gluten items since the 30 days without them, and for the first time in my life I experienced acid reflux and still do every time I eat it. The symptoms from gluten still have yet to abate.

I now know gluten is the main culprit of my symptoms. When I choose to eat it I have to decide if what I am about to eat is worth the symptoms that will follow. This mindset allows me to prioritize and only choose the treats worth the aggravation and skip the crappy items like store-bought cookies or stale crackers (things I would never normally skip) in favor of something delicious. Like minimalism, I get to choose the important things and filter out the rest. I keep the things worth having (aka: eating gluten for special occasions) and avoid the things not worth my time (aka: pie. Not my thing). Just like minimalism, diets and sensitivities are different person to person. Only you can choose what works for you and only you can choose what to avoid.

Rise & Shine: 30 Days of a Morning Routine

morning

Well I have taken quite a hiatus. Nearly four months of one from writing this blog. I would blame it on being “busy” but honestly it is more I have not pushed myself to write. Writing, even though it brings me joy, can be frustrating. It is also like having a second job and there are days (multiple days) when I do not feel motivated and instead of doing it anyway I give in to my lazyness and skip it.

I have had a lot of time to reflect these past four months and have taken time to really sort through my priorities for the life I want. I want to be productive. I do not mean busy. Productive to me includes rest, but it also includes perseverance towards the things that matter. This means working towards goals and sorting through my life meticulously spending my time on what it is important and abandoning what is not. Busy is what I do to distract myself from dealing with emotions or problems. It is also something I do to feel better about myself because social media tells me if I am busy then I am successful.

For me, in order to be productive I have to wake up and get to work. I have a tendency to lackadaisically waltz through life, hitting snooze on everything literally and figuratively. So my goal for the next 30 days is to stick to a morning routine that will set my day up for success and purpose.

I hate mornings. Sounds like something Garfield the cat would say in the Sunday comics section, but it is true. As much as I wish I was a morning person, I cannot seem to motivate myself to crawl out of bed when the sun rises with a smile plastered across my face (looking at you Cinderella….) I certainly envy those who do.

I have tried to set my alarm early, labeling it in my iPhone something cute like “Rise and Shine” (this is pre Kylie Jenner by the way) or even something motivational like “Get up and shower, you slob”. Still, I hit the snooze button, throw my hair in a bun, and then run out the door with hot coffee spilling down my hand and my lunch left on the counter.

I may not love getting up early, but I have learned that it is essential to making sure I can get ready for the day without feeling rushed or stressed. This way I spend the day feeling good, working better, and staving off the inevitable side effects of work stress. The key to being able to start my day off earlier is to wake up earlier. Not rocket science. Nothing starts my day off worse than hitting my “snooze” button multiple times and then realizing I have fifteen minutes to get to work.

The only way to wake up earlier and feel good is to go to sleep earlier than I want to. Again, not rocket science. People will argue that due to kids, work, insomnia, or any other laundry list of reasons, that it is impossible for them to go to sleep earlier than they already do. That may be true for some, but I believe for most the situation is similar to mine. I find excuses to stay up like binge watching episodes of my favorite tv shows or reading memes on my cellphone until odd hours of the night. Instead, I have started packing my lunch and picking out my clothes the night before and setting a bedtime and sticking to it.

For 30 days, starting November 1st, my simple morning routine will look something like this:

  1. Do NOT hit snooze. This one is going to be the hardest part of my day, guaranteed. I obviously lead a very privileged life. Hitting snooze means I am already procrastinating and sets up my day to be the same as my first moments awake. I will be waking up at least an hour before I usually would. This gives me time to complete the below items.
  2. Wash Face. I have never done this until recently. I started splashing my face with freezing cold water in the mornings and it (obviously) works. It is horrible, but it works and it wakes me up.
  3. Drink Water. Every night I will fill up my water bottle and set it on my bedside table. Then when my alarm goes off at its normal offensive morning hour, the first thing I do is lean over, grab it, and just start chugging to replace all the fluids I have lost while drooling and sweating through the night.
  4. Eat Breakfast. Seems so simple, it is literally in the name: break fast. Our bodies need fuel after a long sleep, we have to end the hours we went without fuel for our bodies. In the mornings I will take a breakfast to go or eat at home, regardless, I will eat. Breakfast will provide me enough energy to get through my morning and hold off the “hanger” until lunch.
  5. Meditate/Pray. Every morning I will take at least five minutes to meditate. Five minutes seems like such a short time, but I cannot sit still. Even when I am watching a movie I have to be doing something else. Five minutes to sit in silence can sometimes feel like torture. So I will start with five minutes and work my way up. This five minutes will also be time to pray. My anxiety significantly decreases when I talk to the big guy/gal upstairs and it is a wonder why I forget to do it every morning.
  6. Write. This morning I am awake and finishing up this post. Taking the time to sit and write takes more discipline than I usually provide myself. I keep wishing I was a writer and instead of doing the one thing writers do (write, obviously) I make excuses as to why I do not have the time. This is why I am setting a morning routine and waking up earlier, specifically to write. If I want to be better at something then I have to practice and the only way to practice writing is to write.

For the month of November I am going to see if the hype of a morning routine is all it is made out to be. While waking up early for me is a challenge, I want to improve my life and one way to do it is being more productive. To be more productive I have to stop laying in bed and scrolling through Instagram wishing my life looks like other productive peoples’ lives. If you read about successful people, one thing that consistently comes up is they wake up early and get going. I intend to test the theory and hopefully not cry in the process.

$how Me The Money.

Budgeting sucks. If only we could all live like multibillionaires and fling our money away on every desire and whim and never have to stress about making ends meet. If money only grew on trees as the saying goes. That would be the life. Sadly, most of us are not billionaires and money does not grow on trees. My fiddle fig leaf is just a regular tree, so I have to prioritize what I spend. This means a budget. If I choose not to budget and spend more than I make then it means: debt.

Debt is nearly synonymous with the “American Dream”. The mentality of “you can have it all”. Just open a credit card (or a few) and you can “afford” the dream car, dream house, dream gadgets, dream wardrobe, and also get yourself some Starbucks every single day. You can also take out $100,000 of school loans for a degree in dance and make it all back and more once you graduate…. or so it is portrayed. One does not even need to sign up to get credit card offers in the mail. They come pouring in like Harry’s Hogwarts letters at the Dursley’s (anything I can do to include a HP reference). It is so easy to go into debt and this is why we do. The media drowns us with ads screaming: “you deserve it!” and “treat yo self!” and it is hard not to listen.

Our friends and neighbors are able to have new cars, well-curated homes, wear the latest trends, go on vacation multiple times a year, and eat out every night so why can’t we? But, if we take a deeper look into people’s lives and budgets we may notice not all of them can actually afford their lifestyles. According to TheBalance.com, the average credit card debt in a United States household was $8,339 as of April 2019. That is just credit card debt, so no car payments, student loans, or mortgages included. I am incredibly lucky to have managed to pay off my school loans and to not have credit card debt, but Paul and I still have car payments, a mortgage, and other financial struggles. We are currently trying to pay for him to do post Bachelor classes so he can be accepted into a Physician Assistant program. This means he is working less and we are paying for courses therefore, we have less disposable income.

This is why we decided to come up with a budget. Each month we set aside money for the essentials: food, mortgage, bills, charity, etc. Then with the leftovers, we decide on how much “fun money” we are going to allow ourselves to have. The “fun money” is for us to do with what we want without the other having a say. This includes clothing, eating/drinking out, gadgets, movies, concerts, classes, etc. For us, we decided on $150 each. This amount may seem exorbitant to some and minuscule to others. It sounded doable to me at first until I realized my bad habits and just how much money I spend a month. Last month Paul and I started our budget and also went 30 days without buying unnecessary items and we ended up saving $800. EIGHT-HUNDRED DOLLARS! That is an insane amount of money for this middle class chick. Think of all the things someone could do with that amount of money. Think of all the dogs I could adopt with that money…

Love him or hate him, the hair sniffing Joe Biden said it right when he stated “Don’t tell me what you value, show me your budget and I’ll tell you what you value.” I cannot even name the amount of times I have tried to tell myself I want to go on a trip because travel is what I value, but then end up ordering junk off Amazon instead. This seems to be a common theme. I overhear coworkers complain about being “broke” and how they want to have money to do something and then watch them go get coffee every morning and then go out to lunch every work day afternoon. As a collective society we kind of suck at budgeting and living within our means. I am speaking from the middle class. I realize there are a lot of people who are lower income and/or people who do live within their means and still do not have enough. It feels we get swept up in the advertisements and competition with one another that we forget what we actually value and want for ourselves.

Like I said, budgeting sucks and I am not very good at it. I am learning and failing and then learning some more. All I can say is I am better today than I was before. The budget has been a tough adjustment, but my eyes are now finally open to the amount of money I waste and now I have learned to prioritize. The American money guru Dave Ramsey, says “A budget is telling your money where to go instead of wondering where it went.” Instead of spending my money on things I do not need, I am now spending it on what I value like saving for an upcoming trip with my friend or experiences with people I love. Budgeting can sometimes feel like a punishment, but with it is reward. A reward of delayed gratification, future possibilities, and overall financial peace. It sucks in the meantime, but is worth it in the end.

Stop, drop, and don’t shop.

The last 30 days have been focused on appreciating what I already have by not buying anything unnecessary. This 30 day challenge has been the hardest for me so far. This past month I have been severely tempted but managed not to cave. It was as if making a sweeping declaration not to shop inspired God to test me with all his might (total exaggeration). I have mentioned in previous post my problem with shopping as well as my inability to stay away from a “good deal”.

Well this month all the “deals” came flooding in. I had one friend offer their “wholesale” discount for one of my favorite brands and stated I could buy anything for the website at a steep discount. Then Paul’s friend offered us his employee discount for the company he works for, which includes over 50% off one of my favorite outdoor brands that carries workout gear (including the best yoga leggings). Then my sister-in-law got a few new vendors for the boutique she owns and received multiple adorable items for the spring collection, not to mention she gives me a “family discount” on all merchandise. Those were just some of the deals that came my way last month.

In the middle of May, our friends got a puppy and we wanted to get them a gift, so where did we go for discounted dog toys? Marshalls and TJ Maxx. The holy mecca of deals. Going in there was torture. There were pillows, candles, plant pots, shoes, clothes, and piles of household items I did not need but desperately wanted. Buying just dog toys for someone else’s dog was difficult to say the least. Full disclosure, however, I did buy oven mitts, yes mitts, because mine have been misplaced or destroyed and I was tired of nearly burning my fingers off using a towel. Paul and I agreed ahead of time we needed those. Otherwise there was no shopping for the 30 days. The final straw was the day before our “no buy” was over I was at the Saturday market with a friend and saw intricate handmade earrings that a vendor made to raise money for her son with Type I Diabetes. If there are three things I love it is: supporting local vendors/businesses/causes, handmade items, and earrings. I had to nearly be dragged away from the booth by my friend.

The three main things I learned from not being able to shop for 30 days were:

  1. Most things I buy on impulse I do not actually want. I realized the things I thought I really wanted that I could not buy I no longer wanted after a few days. There were things I told myself I would go back and buy after the 30 days were up, but once they were I realized I no longer even liked them. Going forward I am going to pause and wait until the next day to buy items. If I decide I really want it the next day I can go back and if not then I have saved myself some $$$.
  2. Just because something is on sale does not mean it is a good deal. Thrifting was my hobby and every time I found something for a “good deal” I would get a rush and feeling of euphoria. It is an addicting feeling. The problem was is I would buy things that I did not need or really love just because it was “cheap” and then I would feel guilty for buying something unnecessary. It is not cheap when I spending money on things that I end getting rid of or not using. Not spending money on things I do not need is the best “deal”.
  3. When I stop spending money on things, I have more money to spend on experiences and people. The last 30 days I made a promise not to shop, but it was also the start of Paul and my budget. We each had $150 to spend on whatever we wanted for the month of May, including going out to eat (fast food included), coffee and alcohol beverages, outings with friends, etc. We decided the set amount and agreed that once our money was used up that is all we get. Nothing makes you realize how much money you spend/waste like being on a budget. I managed to make it through the month, using my last $5 on May 31st. It may seem like $150 is a lot of money, but it is not when you are me and love to buy clothes and shoes. One pair of leather shoes can cost $150 alone. Instead of spending money on clothes, I spent it on coffee and brunch dates with friends, a weekend getaway to the beach for a friend’s birthday, and goat yoga, which is literally yoga with goats climbing on your back (yes, it is a very Oregon thing). The money I could have spent on shoes I spent on quality time with the people I love.

When I think back to all the things I have bought and not used or liked it makes me feel a bit sick. I have been reckless with my money. Having a budget and not shopping for the last 30 days has really shown me just how reckless and impulsive I can be. When I did not have the option to shop I had to get creative by using what I already had or borrowing items from other people. The budget showed me how many things I could go without and taught me to prioritize what was important or what I could forgo. By not buying frivolous things I allow myself the opportunity to have funds for important things. Instead of looking at budgeting as a hardship, I now see it enhances gratitude, wellbeing, and highlights what is important. The delayed gratification and the work it takes to budget and to have self-control with spending is worth the effort when it means I can have a financially stable future.

Check On It.

Yes, the title of this post is a Beyoncé song and it was fitting for my post content, but not at all related to the song. A few days ago, I was lost down the “rabbit hole” of social media and decided to “check up on” some former friends to see the going-ons of their lives. I already knew it was not a good idea, but did it anyway because if there is one thing I lack it is self control. There is a quote I scrolled past while on social media urging “stop checking on people that are not checking on you”. It could very well have meant physically checking up on people but I took it as checking up on people via internet “stalking”. I should have heeded the advice. Instead, I leapt face first into my former friends’ social media lives and came up gasping for air and feeling like a complete failure. 

One of them had posts highlighting the fact they had their dream career after graduating from a Master’s program and were able to buy and renovate a house and buy a new car. The other one had posted about recently graduating with a doctoral degree in psychology while living their dream in Southern California. 

Instead of feeling happy for their success I felt horrible about my own perceived lack thereof. I sat there ticking off the list of things they had succeeded in that I had not. For me, my lack of education was a huge hit to my feelings of self worth. I am very well aware that there are very brilliant, successful people without advanced degrees and plenty of people with advanced degrees who are so stupid it makes me question how they were ever able to pass kindergarten let alone obtain an advanced degree. However, continuing education is a sore spot for me. I am currently working so my husband, Paul can go back to school for a career in the medical field, which means I currently do not have the means to go back to school myself to obtain a doctorate or master degree. This makes me feel really behind even though I am grateful to be able to put Paul through school . I know this season of life will pass but seeing other people who are more successful right now hits a particular nerve. 

I brought my feelings up to Paul and he replied “You do not know anything about these people anymore. They could have thousands of dollars of school debt or just be pretending to love their lives. They only post on social media what they want the world to see”.

Touché. People only post on social media what they want others to see. Let me repeat that for my own benefit: people only post on social media what they want others to see. People do not (usually) post their bad marriages, insecurities, failures, debt, or hatred for their jobs. I certainly do not post those things (except here, obviously). There may even be people who look at my accounts and think my life is anything but a clusterfuck, so maybe I need to listen to my own advice and stop posting just the highlights of life…..

I could go delete all my social media accounts to spare myself from comparison but there are people that I do find inspiring that do not make me feel as though I am not enough. I follow accounts that promote art, comedy, zero waste, puppies, minimalism, Golden Girls, intersectional feminism, and body positivity. All these accounts inspire me and therefore I want to go on social media to see them. Instead of purging all social media I have decided to purge all the accounts of people who spark feelings of failure or insecurity. I am going to Marie Kondo my social media and rid myself of accounts that do not “spark joy”. Does that mean I am ridding accounts of anyone successful? No. If someone posts they trained hard and put blood, sweat, and tears into running a marathon and finally did it then I want to see that success. If someone posts pictures of their perfect house, life, marriage, kids, career and claims they have it all because they are #blessed, then yes, I am blocking them. 

I am also going to block people I am no longer friends with, not to be a bitch, but because the chapter of my life is closed and I do not want to keep rereading those stories when I could be creating new ones.  They are allowed to be successful and post about it, but I am no longer going to allow myself to be subjected to it. I am going to be kind to myself and this means I am going to stop checking up on the past and focus on the present and the future. I am going to do what Queer Eye’s Jonathan Van Ness does and not worry about what everyone else is doing and just keep focusing on my own thing (and keep dancing in my kitchen). 

30 Days of No Shopping.

Spoiler alert: I like to shop. Similar to a lot of people with shopping problems I like to find deals. As I have stated previously, I love the hunt, to dig through the racks of vintage or used clothes and find cheap treasures that otherwise would have cost me a small fortune. The irony is that I spend money on things I do not need or sometimes do not even particularly like because I think I am saving money….. The problem with shopping-especially thrifting-is that I wind up with a bunch of excess items because they were a “good deal” or I saw something cute and felt I might “regret it” later if I didn’t buy it. The photo above is a great example of a thrift find I purchased because I worried I would regret it if I did not buy a white sequined dress from the sixties, you know, a very reasonable closet must….

There are things that do not go together like toothpaste and orange juice or minimalism and a shopping problem. I recognize that in order to work towards a more minimal and meaningful life I have to give up some stuff, literally give it away and get rid of it. There are mental things that weigh me down but also a lot of physical things, like clothes. Clothes for me is the biggest issue, it always has been. I buy items to fit the person I want to be instead of the person I am. Fit is both literal and figurative. Clothes I buy can be for the size I wish I was as well as for the personality I wish I had. I will see some bohemian goddess wearing a floral jumpsuit and I go hunting for a floral jumpsuit because I want to be a bohemian even though I do not really like jumpsuits. It is almost as if I forget that just because I wear the outfit of a bohemian goddess does not make me one. Just like wearing a pantsuit does not make me Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez or wearing crop tops with heels make me Jonathan Van Ness. My ultimate goal is to stop and figure out my style and only buy what fits my current body and what I actually like and need, but for now I just need to take a step back and just stop buying altogether.

These next 30 days I will not be buying any unnecessary items. These include:

  1. Clothes, obviously.
  2. Home Items: artwork, dishware, linens, knick-knacks, furniture, etc.
  3. Fast Food.
  4. Beauty products: Duplicate make-up, nail polish, face-masks, etc. (This does not including needs like shampoo, sunscreen, or toothpaste if they run out).
  5. Media: Books, movies, apps, etc.
  6. Misc: Soveniers, candles, or any other items I see at TJ Maxx and convince myself I need to have…

Things that I am allowed to buy are necessities like shampoo or the items mentioned above, groceries, or gas. Other things that are not included are experiences. Paul decided to join me for this 30 day challenge and we agreed to not exclude experiences as part of the 30 day no-buy. This includes going out to eat or drink (if with friends), concerts/live shows, movies in the theatre, surfing/snowboarding, and weekend getaways. We gave ourselves a pass because we have a friend’s birthday coming up that includes a weekend getaway and the whole purpose of this shopping ban is to stop buying frivolous things. I believe spending time with people you love and spending money on experiences over things is not frivolous, it’s valuable.

This 30 day ban is really going to test me. When I feel sad or stressed I go to thrifts shops and wander around, buy things and then it makes me feel better. This is the reason shopping can be an addiction. It gives you a pick-me-up, a feeling of euphoria until the second you get home and realize how much you spent. Then the guilt comes calling. The same is true for thrifting. Am I really saving money if I am buying things I don’t really need? If we are not testing and pushing ourselves then we don’t grow. So in the next 30 days I fully expect to grow like a redwood.

30 Days of Less Waste.

The last 30 days have been all about waste. I have made it a point to really focus on all the unnecessary waste I create while living as a middle class person in America. When I really paid attention I was disgusted with how much I, a single human, can create.

My goals for the last 30 days were to focus on five areas where I could reduce waste. They included: not buying new clothes, bringing my own reusable coffee cups to coffee shops, bringing my own bags to the grocery store, creating less food waste, and bringing my own containers for restaurant leftovers. 

Out of the fives things I did there were three things I did great at, one I did okay at, and one I failed miserably at. As much as I would like to give myself credit for the things I did well, there is always room for improvement.

I will review the things I did great first because I should be kinder to myself and highlight triumphs verses failures. As Lana Del Rey in her song Blue Jeans says “Whether you fail or fly, oh shit at least you tried”. Overall, I improved my carbon footprint and was more mindful of my choices and will continue to improve moving forward.

  1. Buying Clothes Used/Thrifted:

I love thrifting. I love the hunt and findings deals. I make a list of what I need and I go “digging”. When I find something I need for a deal it is like finding gold. With websites that sell used clothing and an abundance of thrift stores in my area, buying clothes used was something I succeeded at and enjoyed doing. For 30 days I did not buy a single clothing item new. This saved resources like water, fuel, fabric, other natural resources, which includes (all) costs of labor. It also kept the clothing out of a landfill and more money in my pocket. My next focus will be not to shop for clothing as I have a thrifting addiction…..

**Ps. My husband, Paul openly mocked me for taking photos of my thrifted clothes that I laid out on the floor for this photo.

2. Reusable Coffee Cup:

I went out for coffee/tea four times in the last 30 days. I usually make coffee at home to save money, but I traveled for work during two days-which meant it was easier to get coffee from a shop vs the Keurig (aka an environmental disgrace) in my hotel room. I also went out for coffee once with my husband as a treat, and one day I just really wanted a matcha latte with macadamia nut milk from a really good local coffee shop just because (and also because I am a millennial and love my fancy milk and fancy tea). Every time I got coffee I brought my reusable cup. I went to Starbucks one time and they used a plastic cup to make my drink and then poured it into my reusable cup and threw the plastic cup away. Therefore, I did not go to Starbucks after that. The other, local coffee vendors made my drink in a steel steamer cup and then poured it into my cup. All vendors gave me ten cents off my drink for bringing my own cup. I kept a clean reusable cup in my car so I would always have one ready for any impromptu coffee stop. Good for the environment and my wallet.

3. Reusable Grocery Bags.

During my 30 days of using reusable bags, my hometown banned single-use plastic bags in retail stores over 10,000 feet (3040 meters) in size. The ban went into effect nine days ago on April 1, 2019. For smaller businesses, the ban will go into effect September 1, 2019. This ban is a huge step towards a more sustainable environment! The past 30 days I have made sure to bring my reusable cloth bags every store I have made purchases, especially for groceries. Some grocery stores even gave me 10 cents off every reusable bag I brought in. In order to be successful, I kept the bags in the back of my car and the moment I got home after shopping I emptied the bags and put them right back in my car. I even got Paul to start using reusable bags before we even knew about the plastic bag ban. Getting him to bring reusable bags to the store I would say was my biggest accomplishment of the 30 days.

4. Less Food Waste.

Food waste was one thing I did okay at improving. I really tried to buy fresh foods that I would be eat before they rotted. I did really well in the beginning. When I noticed there were vegetables in the fridge starting to turn I added them to soups or cut them up and froze them for later. I stored food in airtight jars so it would stay fresh. I even tried to clear out the fridge to avoid missing food and it expiring in the back. One time I cooked a chicken in my Instant Pot and saved the broth leftover to use for another recipe. There were a few times I missed items like a red pepper in a container that was half chopped and got slimy, a moldy container of (unrecognizable) leftovers, a sweet potato that was wrinkly and growing extra sprouts, and a carrot that was hidden under a bag of apples that was shriveled up. Otherwise, I really focused on eating up leftover foods to avoid them going bad and was more mindful about not overbuying items that would not get eaten quick enough. There is room for improvement, but I am getting better at improving my waste. I even am going to purchase a compost bin for food scraps so I can turn it back into nutritious dirt for my garden.

5. Reusable Takeout Containers/Utensils:

I did terrible at remembering to bring reusable containers to restaurants for leftovers. I did not even do it once. I had a reusable container in my car ready to use and still did not manage to use it. I went out to dinner a few times in the last 30 days. One time I went to a restaurant that had a bunch of food trucks lined up, but we went in Paul’s car so I did not have the container. I saw everyone was using paper plates so I figured I would be fine, but unfortunately the food truck I chose had styrofoam containers (aka satan’s takeout containers) instead. Another time, I was out of town for work and ate most meals out. One of the times I ordered what I assumed was a light breakfast, but ended up being a feast. I did not want to waste the food, but I had forgotten to bring my container on the trip so I asked for one. It was (of course) styrofoam. Then a few days later I went to visit my friend who was sick and she had ordered us ramen to be delivered to the house before I got there. The food arrived in plastic containers with plastic utensils and in a plastic bag. The only time I ate out that did not require a container was when I had a friend eat the leftovers because I had been in Paul’s car and had forgotten my box (again) and did not want to waste takeout containers. Needless to say, I sucked at this one. The only perk was I kept a fork and spoon and reusable napkin in my tote bag so any time I needed one of those items I had them handy. When a coworker wanted help eating their takeout I pulled my own reusable spoon out to use. When I needed a napkin for my snacks at work, I used my own.

There were many things I improved upon in the past 30 days to decrease my impact on the environment and some that could use more work. While I chose to focus on these five, I incorporated other things like using reusable bags for my snacks instead of ziplocks, buying a shampoo bar and bar soap instead of ones in bottles, and even remembering to turn off the lights for every room I left in the house. These are small changes, but if every single person could make similar, small changes the world would see a big impact. I am motivated to experiment and consciously make more eco-friendly choices because as the philosopher Albus Dumbledore once said (and because I want to end on a Harry Potter quote) “It is our choices that show what we truly are, far more than our abilities”